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Mission

The mission of the Department of Education is to equip students with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that will prepare them to become effective educators. Our future educators are reflective, collaborative teachers and leaders who are dedicated to impacting PK-12 education in an increasingly diverse, technological, and global society, who promote a lifelong commitment to learning. The Department accomplishes this mission by offering high-quality programs that provide experiences designed to respect the diversity of children, their families, and communities.

Students interested in professional education programs are encouraged to begin preparation for the Praxis Core test upon entry to the University. The Education Advising and Assessment Center serves as a great resource to assist students in preparing for the test, which is required for program entry.

Students seeking licensure in the Department of Education must meet all entry, continuation and exit requirements. Students should seek advisors in both the Department of Education and the major area to obtain materials outlining requirements.

Education - Curriculum 2.5      Education - Curriculum 4   

Accreditation

All initial licensure programs offered in the Department of Education are accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP).  All programs are also approved by the Department of Education of the Commonwealth of Virginia. All initial licensure programs, [Elementary- Interdisciplinary Studies for Elementary Education; Secondary- English, Biology, Mathematics, Music vocal and instrumental] were accredited effective fall 2018 through Spring of 2025. The School Counseling Program is accreditation is extended under NCATE until December 31, 2021.

All students seeking endorsement are prepared to pass all national and state professional entry and licensure tests. The Department of Education has been highly successful in placing students in various areas of education.

Students who graduate from the Department with teaching degrees are approved for teaching in 45 states without requiring extra certification courses.

 All Interdisciplinary Studies majors with option leading to endorsement in Elementary Education, Health and Physical Education majors, and music, math, biology, and English majors seeking a teaching endorsement must be admitted to the Department of Education.  CAEP requires each nationally accredited education preparation provider to report annually on program impact and outcome measures. The following information satisfies that requirement:

CAEP Annual Performance Measures

Measure 1: Impact on P-12 student learning and development (Component 4.1)

  • The 2019-2020 EPP Completer Impact Study Data involves the collection and analysis of Annual Summative Evaluation for Measure 1:  Impact on P-12 student learning and development. The evaluations measure impact in 7 areas to include Instructional Delivery. 100% of the completers with Elementary and Music endorsements received 3.0 or higher in the teaching specializations of Professional Knowledge, Instructional Planning, Assessment of and for Learning, Learning Environment and Professionalism, and Student Academic Progress. These scores indicate completers are were proficient/effective teachers after their first year of teaching. Student Academic Progress measures how the work of the teacher results in measurable, appropriate, and acceptable student progress. 100% of the completers were rated as effective in making an impact on student learning. One completer scored exemplary of the area of Professionalism. This rating suggested that the teacher continually engaged in high level growth opportunities that result in enhanced student learning and in the growth of a positive learning environment.

Measure 2: Indicators of teaching effectiveness (Component 4.2) 

  • Employers surveyed in 2018-2019 agreed that program completers met 100% of the professional standards designed to suggest that beginning teachers have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to be effective. Furthermore, those employers were extremely satisfied with how program completers demonstrated leadership, planned instruction, and managed their classrooms. 

Measure 3: Satisfaction of employers and employment milestones (Component 4.4/A.4.1)

  • Employers surveyed in 2018-2019 agreed that program completers met 100% of the professional standards designed to suggest that beginning teachers have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to be effective. Furthermore, those employers were extremely satisfied with how program completers demonstrated leadership, planned instruction, and managed their classrooms. 

        Notable Department of Education Alumni (Employment Milestones): 

  • Mrs. Alberta Williams King ( (Mother of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. )  earned a teaching certificate from the Hampton Normal and Industrial Institute (now Hampton University) in 1924.
  • Dr. Mary Christian (B.S. 1955) - first African American and first female from Hampton to be elected to the State legislature, post Reconstruction. She served nine consecutive terms representing Virginia’s 92 House District.
  • Dr. Diane Boardley-Suber (B.S. 1971) 10th President of St. Augustine’s University.
  • Dr. Helen Stiff Williams (B.S. 73) -Former Division Chief and Assistant Superintendent of Instruction in the Virginia Department of Education; One of the leading scholars in the field of Character Education.
  • Tiffany Hunter ( 2012 )  - Science Educator and 2012-2013 Courtland High School New Teacher of the Year, Southampton, County, Courtland, VA.
  • Courtney Wilson (2011) - 2013-2014 Cesar Tarrant Elementary School Teacher of the Year, Hampton, VA.
  • Kimberly Oliver (B.S. 1998) - 2006 National Teacher of the Year, Broad Acres Elementary School, Montgomery County,  Silver Springs, Maryland.
  • Angela Pierce, Guerschmide Saint-Ange and Juanita Devlin placed first in the FBI Curriculum Development Challenge Competition.
  • JoWanda Rollins earned the Teaching Profession's Top Credential, National Board Certification.
  • Ashlye Rumph-Geddis published a children's book, Tori Finds Shapes All Around. 
  • Anastazia Neely (2012 Interdisciplinary Studies graduate with Elementary Endorsement) earned a Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree in Environmental Science and Policy from the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs in New York in 2013. Currently, she serves as the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Coordinator for Teaching and Learning at the Convent of the Sacred Heart.
  • Jasmine Harrison (May, 2021 MT graduate in Math) is currently  serving as a middle school Math Department Chairperson for the 2020-2021 academic year. 
  • Orianna Alexander (2018 Interdisciplinary Studies graduate with Elementary Endorsement) is currently enrolled in law school pursuing a Doctor of Jurisprudence (JD) degree.
  • Jonathan Simms (2017 MT in English graduate) served as an Electronics and Circuits Instructor in the summer of 2018 and 2019 for the Verizon Innovation Learning program designed for males in middle school. The grant was awarded to Hampton University by Verizon. Mr. Simms was also recognized as the 2020 Teacher of the Year at Mary Passage Middle Schools in Newport News, VA.

Measure 4: Satisfaction of completers (Component 4.4/A.4.2)

  •  A First-year Teacher survey of the 2018-2019 completers indicated that overall 100% of the completers rated the program as having exceeded their expectation regarding their preparation for their first year of teaching. Results disaggregated by 10 InTASC standards suggested that expectations were exceeded on 90% of the InTASC Standards and met expectations on InTASC standard 5 (Application of Content). The two highest ratings were on InTASC Standard 9  (Professional Learning and Ethical Practices) and InTASC Standard 1 (Learner Development). Learner Development suggests that first-year teachers believed the EPP prepared them well to create lesson plans and activities that operate at multiple levels to meet the needs of diverse learners. The rating on learner development also suggests that the EPP prepared the completers to design instruction to the learner’s stage of development, learning style, strengths, and needs in a way that exceeded their expectations. 

 OUTCOME MEASURES 

Measure 5: Graduation rates (Component 4.4)

  • Number of Completers in 2021:6
  • Number of Completers in 2020: 4
  • Number of Completers in 2019: 10
  • Number of Completers in 2018: 7
  • Number of Completers in 2017: 29
  • Number of Completers in 2016: 19
  • Number of Completers 2015: 23

 Measure 6: Ability of completers to meet licensing (certification) and/or additional state requirements

  • 100% of teacher education graduates pass state licensing assessments (2015-2020)

Additionally, the following link to the Hampton University Department of Education’s Title II reports provides disaggregated information for 2015-2019 completers’ exam pass rates (https://title2.ed.gov/Public/Report/DataFiles/DataFiles.aspx?p=5_01). The reports also includes median GPA of those who were admitted and completed the program from 2015-2019.

  • Median GPA of Individuals completing the program academic year 2018-2019:  3.35
  • Median GPA of Individuals completing the program academic year 2017-2018: 3.46
  • Median GPA of Individuals accepted into the program academic year 2017-2018: 3.46

 

Recent Praxis II Content Knowledge Pass Rates, Mean Scores, and Best Performance Areas based on State Cut-scores Comparisons

Ability of Completers to Meet State Licensing (Certification) Requirements

(Data as reported to Title II and CAEP Accreditation Annual Reports)

 

All program completers for state-required assessment

Number taking test

Average scaled score

Number passing test

Pass rate (%)

*Statewide average pass rate (%)

*Statewide average scaled score

2018-2019

MS Social Studies 5004

5

170

5

100

100

166

MS Science 5005

6

177

6

100

100

170

MS Math 5003

10

170

10

100

100

173

MS Reading 5002

8

177

8

100

100

170

Music 5113

3

169

3

100

100

168

VCLA

10

495

10

100

100

 

RVE

6

176

6

100

100

175

Biology 5235

1

158

1

100

100

163

2017-2018

MS Social Studies 5004

2

179

2

100

100

158

MS Science 5005

2

181

2

100

100

162

MS Math 5003

4

180

4

100

100

166

MS Reading 5002

4

184

4

100

100

165

HPE 5856/5857

1

160

1

100

100

 

Music 5113

1

175

1

100

100

163

VCLA

6

506

6

100

100

 

RVE

2

170

2

100

100

 

 

*Best Content Knowledge Performance Areas based on Highest Number of Points Above Cut-score

 Average Scaled ScoreState Cut-score*Best Content Knowledge Performance Areas Number taking testNumber PassingPass Rate(%)
2015-2016
MS Social Studies 5004 173.25 155 Social Studies for Elementary Educators(+18) 4 4 100
MS Science 5005 167.5 159   4 4 100
MS Math 5003 185 157 Math for Elementary Educators(+25) 4 4 100
MS Reading 5002 173.25 157   4 4 100
RVE 174 157   4 4 100
Music 5113 164.5 160   2 2 100
HPE 5857/5856 164.7 160(5856)   9 9 100
VCLA 495.5 470 Communication and Literacy Skills (+19) 15 15 100

 

 Average Scaled ScoreState Cut-Score*Best Content Knowledge Performance Areas Number taking testNumber PassingPass Rate(%)
2014-2015
MS Social Studies 5004 175 155 Social Studies for Elementary Educators(+20) 4 4 100
MS Science 5005 167.5 159   4 4 100
MS Math 5003 169.5 157   4 4 100
MS Reading 5002 184.75 157 Reading for Elementary Teachers (+28) 4 4 100
RVE 171 157   4 4 100
Music 5113 164.5 160   2 2 100
HPE 5857/5856 160.41 160(5857)   12 12 100
English 0041 175 172 Communication and Literacy Skills (+19) 1 1 100
VCLA 508 470 Communication and Literacy Skills (+38) 19 19 100

 

Ability of Completers to Meet State Licensing (Certification) Requirements (2010-2013)

Data as reported to Title II and CAEP Accreditation Annual Report

All program completers for state-required assessmentNumber taking testAverage scaled scoreNumber passing testPass rate (%)*Statewide average pass rate (%)*Statewide average scaled score
2012-2013
Elementary 0014 1 166 1 100 Not available Not available
Elementary 5014 12 153 12 100 Not available Not available
English 0041 1 176 1 100 Not available Not available
English 5041 4 179 4 100 Not available Not available
HPE 0856 6 159 6 100 Not available Not available
HPE 5856 3 160 3 100 Not available Not available
Mathematics 1 148 1 100 Not available Not available
Music 1 160 1 100 Not available Not available
VCLA 27 520 27 100 Not available Not available
VRA 1 236 1 100 Not available Not available
RVE 12 166 12 100 Not available Not available
2011-2012
Biology 1 166 1 100 100 170
Elementary 5014 15 158 15 100 100 172
English 2 184 2 100 100 185
HPE 4 160 4 100 100 165
VCLA 22 523 22 100 100 544
VRA 6 258 6 100 100 259
RVE 9 164 9 100 100 176
2010-2011
Elementary 0014 6 161 6 100 100 171
Elementary 5014 2 161 2 100 100 172
English 1 186 1 100 99 185
HPE 4 164 4 100 99 166
Music 1 161 1 100 100 171
VCLA 19 531 19 100 100 545
VRA 10 250 10 100 100 259

 

Measure 7: Ability of completers to be hired in education positions for which they were prepared. 

  • 100% of teacher education graduates from 2018-2020 were gainfully employed as teachers, program directors/facilitators, or attending a graduate program at most one year after graduation. 

Measure 8: Students loan default rates and other consumer information

Section 435(a) (2) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (the HEA) provides that institutions lose eligibility to participate in the Federal Direct Loan and Federal Pell Grant programs when the institution’s federal student loan Cohort Default Rate exceeds 30 percent for each of the three most recently completed federal fiscal years beginning with federal fiscal year 2015. Under Section 435(a)(7) of the HEA, an institution that has a Cohort Default Rate of 30 percent or greater for any one federal fiscal year is required to establish a Default Prevention Task Force to reduce defaults and prevent the loss of institutional eligibility.

As of September 2018, all 93 eligible HBCUs [including Hampton University] have official FY 2015 3-year cohort default rates that fall below regulatory thresholds. No HBCUs are subject to cohort default rate sanctions or the consequent loss of Title IV student financial assistance program eligibility.

HBCUs have deployed innovative approaches towards default management and reduction. Such strategies include implementation of a default management plan that engages stakeholders, identifies approaches to reducing default rates, and tracks measurable goals. These schools have increased borrower awareness of obligations through incorporating borrower topics at orientation sessions and providing enhanced entrance and exit counseling. Other best practices include borrower tracking, increased contact with delinquent borrowers, taking advantage of the cohort default rate challenge/adjustment/appeal processes, and partnering with other stakeholders to optimize default prevention, resolution, and reduction.

Source: https://www2.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/defaultmanagement/dmd002.html

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