Curriculum

Program Offerings

The Department of Education offers an experiential focused curriculum leading to the following degrees:

Secondary Education in Biology, English, Mathematics, or Music (M.T.)

 Research Degree Programs

  

Education Highlights

Hampton University Leadership Academy

The U.S. Department of Education’s School Leadership Program awarded Hampton University a $322,489 grant for five years, totaling $2.69 Million in support of the Hampton University Leadership Academy (HULA).  The Department of Education will partner with area school districts to implement a multifaceted approach towards improving student achievement by improving the effectiveness of educational leadership.  Read more...

Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program

Hampton University also received the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program grant from the National Science Foundation.  The five year award, in the amount of $840,881, supports a collaborative effort between the School of Science and the Department of Education that aims to prepare undergraduates and professions in science, technology, engineering, or math fields to become K-12 teachers in high-need, economically disadvantaged public school districts.  The grant intends to ensure that more minority students will join the ranks of highly qualified STEM teachers. 

 

The Department has been highly successful in placing students in various areas of education. Students who graduate from the Department with teaching degrees are approved for licensure in Virginia and may qualify for licensure in 45 other states through reciprocity. Approximately 95% of the students majoring in education receive jobs within their field. The other 5% of the students continue on to graduate schools. 

 

Education Advising and Assessment Center

The Education Advising and Assessment Center (EAAC) provides assistance to undergraduate and graduate students seeking a license to teach in the State of Virginia or aiming to become certified support personnel in education. Students are provided access to an array of resources to include the latest in test preparation for the Praxis Core Academic Skills Test for Educators, the Reading for Virginia Educators (RVE) Examination, the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA), the Praxis Elementary Education: Content Knowledge (CKT) Test, the Praxis Subject Assessments, and the National Counselor Exam (NCE). Diagnostic assessments are conducted to assess students' strengths and weaknesses, to ensure differentiation of instruction, and to meet the targeted needs of students. The Center is also open to non-education majors who are preparing for the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The Center is located in Phenix Hall, Room 302.

Contact Us for Reading, Writing and Math Tutors 757.728.6735

Director: 757.728.6589

Hours of Operation

Monday-Thursday: 9 AM to 7 PM and Fridays: 9 AM to 4 PM.

 

Department of Education Admissions Requirements

  • Completed at least 45 hours of study
  • "C" or better in ENG 101, ENG 102, COM 103, and MAT 110 (or higher)
  • 2.5 GPA or higher
  • Standardized Reading, Writing, and Math Proficiency

    Option A: Passing VCLA (470) with minimum Reading (235) and Writing (235) scores and Praxis Core Math scores (150)
    Option B: Passing Praxis Core scores (Reading-156; Writing-162; Math-150)
    Option C: Composite SAT scores (1170) with minimum Math-560; Reading plus Writing-580
    Option D: Composite ACT scores (24) with minimum Math –22; plus Reading-46
  • Copy of Dyslexia Certificate
  • Copy of SAT or ACT scores
  • 2 Sealed letters of recommendations from persons outside of the Department
  • 3 Copies of essay entitled, “Why I want to teach?”
  • Completed Application Form and Copy of Unofficial Transcript

Distinctions:

  • Small Class Sizes
  • Certification options in high need STEM Areas
  • Departmental Tutors and Resources for Professional Exam Preparation
  • Five Year Master Teacher Program
  • Accelerated 2.5 Year Ph.D. Program in Education
  • View Video

 

Official Year Founded: 1929

Department of Education Chairperson: Dr. Martha Jallim-Hall

Mailing Address:Department of Education
P.O. Box 6195
Hampton, Virginia 23668 

Phone: 757.727.5793
Fax: 757.727.5534
Email: education@hamptonu.edu


Consumer Information:


Scholarships

Scholarships: The Hampton University Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program is designed to encourage and prepare talented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors and professionals to become mathematics and science teachers. This program is offered by Hampton University (HU) in collaboration with the National Science Foundation and helps interested and eligible students to become highly qualified STEM teachers and pursue their teaching careers.

The HU Noyce Teacher program provides scholarships, stipends, and academic programs for undergraduate STEM majors and post-baccalaureate students holding STEM degrees who are committed to teaching after graduation from the program.

As an undergraduate biology or mathematics major and a Noyce Teacher Scholarship recipient, you can receive scholarship funding for up to a maximum of three years that includes:

  • $2,700 stipend for participating in an internship program in the summer between your freshman and sophomore year and the sophomore and junior year;
  • Scholarship funding that can cover up to the entire cost of attendance at HU annually during your junior year, senior year, and one year of graduate study!
Mary T. Christian Endowed Scholarship Deemed appropriate to a well-deserved student in the field of Education $2,891
Arlene W. Clinkseale Endowed Scholarship Well deserving student majoring in teaching. $1,347
Rayford & Frances Harris Endowed Scholarship Well deserving student with financial need, who is majoring in Teacher Education $2,391
Dr. John & Mary Hewlett Endowed Scholarship The scholarship recent shall have at least a 2.75 grade point average.  The recipient must be going into education or majoring in education with an emphasis on teaching $5,760
Hope Teaching Fellowship Endowment The scholarship shall be awarded to recipients who choose to pursue a career in the profession of teaching. $2,689
Henry C. & Emma E. Roane Endowed Scholarship The scholarship shall be offered to a student who shows evidence of the desire to become a teacher.
In awarding the scholarship, emphasis shall be placed on the characteristics and abilities, which equip the student to become a leader. 
The recipient should have a level of scholarship and noteworthy success in extracurricular activities and, in addition, possess a balance of desirable personal qualities such as strong moral character, integrity, and a sense of citizenship. 
The recipient must be involved in volunteerism in the community beyond the walls of the campus.
$2,321

The TEACH Grant Program

This grant provides grants of up to $4,000 a year to students who are completing or plan to complete course work needed to begin a career in teaching.

The Virginia Teaching Scholarship  Loan Program

The 2018 Virginia General Assembly appropriated $708,000 in support of the Virginia Teaching Scholarship Loan Program (VTSLP). Subject to available funding, scholarship amounts will be based on $10,000 per academic year for full-time students and shall be prorated for part-time students based on the number of credit hours. 

Subject to available funding, these scholarship loans are for teacher candidates, including graduate students and paraprofessionals from Virginia school divisions enrolled in an approved teacher education program at an accredited Virginia public or private four-year institution of higher education in the Commonwealth. Candidates must (i) be enrolled full-time or part-time in an approved undergraduate or graduate teacher education program or are participants in another approved teacher education program; (ii) have maintained a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.7 on a 4.0 scale or its equivalent; and (iii) be nominated for such scholarship by the institution where they are enrolled and meet the criteria and qualifications, pursuant to § 22.1-290.01, Code of Virginia, except as provided herein. Awards shall be made to candidates who are enrolled full-time or part-time in an approved undergraduate or graduate teacher education programs for the top five critical teacher shortage disciplines; however, a minority teacher candidates may be enrolled in any content area for teacher preparation. Teacher candidates who previously received funding through the Virginia Teaching Scholarship Loan Program are not eligible. 

“Minority student candidate” is defined as Black (includes Jamaican, Bahamians and other Caribbeans of African descent), Hispanic (includes person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central or South American or other Spanish origin or culture), Asian and Asian American (includes Pakistanis, Indians, and Pacific Islanders), and American Indians (includes Alaskans).

 


2016-2017 Undergraduate Tuition, Room, & Board

Tuition (All Students) $21,552

Comprehensive Fees $2,690

Total Tuition $24,242

Room/Board $10,684

Undergraduate Per Credit Hour $548.00


CAEP Annual Performance Measures

Accreditation

All initial licensure programs offered in the Department of Education are accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP).  All programs are also approved by the Department of Education of the Commonwealth of Virginia.  All students seeking endorsement are prepared to pass all national and state professional entry and licensure tests. The Department of Education has been highly successful in placing students in various areas of education.

Students who graduate from the Department with teaching degrees are approved for teaching in 45 states without requiring extra certification courses.

 All Interdisciplinary Studies majors with option leading to endorsement in Elementary Education, Health and Physical Education majors, and music, math, biology, and English majors seeking a teaching endorsement must be admitted to the Department of Education.  CAEP requires each nationally accredited education preparation provider to report annually on program impact and outcome measures. The following information satisfies that requirement:

Measure 1: Impact on P-12 student learning and development (Component 4.1)

  • The majority of all employers agreed that program completers met all 100% of the professional standards designed to suggest that beginning teachers have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to be effective. Furthermore, those employers were extremely satisfied with how program completers demonstrated leadership, planned instruction, and managed their classrooms.
  • Recent polls revealed that the majority of all first year teachers expressed satisfaction with the level and type of assistance given to them by the Department of Education.

Measure 2: Indicators of teaching effectiveness (Component 4.2) 

  • Employers agreed that program completers met 100% of the professional standards designed to suggest that beginning teachers have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to be effective. Furthermore, those employers were extremely satisfied with how program completers demonstrated leadership, planned instruction, and managed their classrooms. 

Measure 3: Satisfaction of employers and employment milestones (Component 4.4/A.4.1)

  • Employers agreed that program completers met 100% of the professional standards designed to suggest that beginning teachers have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to be effective. Furthermore, those employers were extremely satisfied with how program completers demonstrated leadership, planned instruction, and managed their classrooms. 
  • 100% of teacher education graduates are gainfully employed or attending a graduate program within four months after graduation. 

Notable Department of Education Alumni: 

  • Mrs. Alberta Williams King ( (Mother of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. )  earned a teaching certificate from the Hampton Normal and Industrial Institute (now Hampton University) in 1924.
  • Dr. Mary Christian (B.S. 1955) - first African American and first female from Hampton to be elected to the State legislature, post Reconstruction. She served nine consecutive terms representing Virginia’s 92 House District.
  • Dr. Diane Boardley-Suber (B.S. 1971) 10th President of St. Augustine’s University.
  • Dr. Helen Stiff Williams (B.S. 73) -Former Division Chief and Assistant Superintendent of Instruction in the Virginia Department of Education; One of the leading scholars in the field of Character Education.
  • Tiffany Hunter ( 2012 )  - Science Educator and 2012-2013 Courtland High School New Teacher of the Year, Southampton, County, Courtland, VA.
  • Courtney Wilson (2011) - 2013-2014 Cesar Tarrant Elementary School Teacher of the Year, Hampton, VA.
  • Kimberly Oliver (B.S. 1998) - 2006 National Teacher of the Year, Broad Acres Elementary School, Montgomery County,  Silver Springs, Maryland.
  • Angela Pierce, Guerschmide Saint-Ange and Juanita Devlin placed first in the FBI Curriculum Development Challenge Competition.
  • JoWanda Rollins earned the Teaching Profession's Top Credential, National Board Certification.
  • Ashlye Rumph-Geddis published a children's book, Tori Finds Shapes All Around. 

Measure 4: Satisfaction of completers (Component 4.4/A.4.2)

  • First year teachers expressed satisfaction with the level and type of assistance given to them by the Department of Education.

 

 OUTCOME MEASURES 

Measure 5: Graduation rates (Component 4.4)

  • Number of Completers in 2018: 7
  • Number of Completers in 2017: 29
  • Number of Completers in 2016: 19
  • Number of Completers 2015: 23

 Measure 6: Ability of completers to meet licensing (certification) and/or additional state requirements

  • 100% of teacher education graduates pass state licensing assessments (2015-2018)

Additionally, the following link to the Hampton University Department of Education’s Title II reports provides disaggregated information for 2015-2018 completers’ exam pass rates (https://title2.ed.gov/Public/Report/DataFiles/DataFiles.aspx?p=5_01). The reports also includes median GPA of those who were admitted and completed the program from 2015-2018. 

  • Median GPA of Individuals completing the program academic year 2014-2015: 3.3
  • Median GPA of Individuals accepted into the program academic year 2014-2015: 3.27

 


 

Recent Praxis II Content Knowledge Pass Rates, Mean Scores, and Best Performance Areas based on State Cut-scores Comparisons

*Best Content Knowledge Performance Areas based on Highest Number of Points Above Cut-score

Average Scaled ScoreState Cut-score*Best Content Knowledge Performance Areas Number taking testNumber PassingPass Rate(%)
2015-2016
MS Social Studies 5004 173.25 155 Social Studies for Elementary Educators(+18) 4 4 100
MS Science 5005 167.5 159   4 4 100
MS Math 5003 185 157 Math for Elementary Educators(+25) 4 4 100
MS Reading 5002 173.25 157   4 4 100
RVE 174 157   4 4 100
Music 5113 164.5 160   2 2 100
HPE 5857/5856 164.7 160(5856)   9 9 100
VCLA 495.5 470 Communication and Literacy Skills (+19) 15 15 100

Recent Praxis II Content Knowledge Pass Rates, Mean Scores, and Best Performance Areas based on State Cut-scores Comparisons

*Best Content Knowledge Performance Areas based on Highest Number of Points Above Cut-score

Average Scaled ScoreState Cut-score*Best Content Knowledge Performance Areas Number taking testNumber PassingPass Rate(%)
2014-2015
MS Social Studies 5004 175 155 Social Studies for Elementary Educators(+20) 4 4 100
MS Science 5005 167.5 159   4 4 100
MS Math 5003 169.5 157   4 4 100
MS Reading 5002 184.75 157 Reading for Elementary Teachers (+28) 4 4 100
RVE 171 157   4 4 100
Music 5113 164.5 160   2 2 100
HPE 5857/5856 160.41 160(5857)   12 12 100
English 0041 175 172 Communication and Literacy Skills (+19) 1 1 100
VCLA 508 470 Communication and Literacy Skills (+38) 19 19 100

 

Ability of Completers to Meet State Licensing (Certification) Requirements

Data as reported to Title II and CAEP Accreditation Annual Report

All program completers for state-required assessmentNumber taking testAverage scaled scoreNumber passing testPass rate (%)*Statewide average pass rate (%)*Statewide average scaled score
2012-2013
Elementary 0014 1 166 1 100 Not available Not available
Elementary 5014 12 153 12 100 Not available Not available
English 0041 1 176 1 100 Not available Not available
English 5041 4 179 4 100 Not available Not available
HPE 0856 6 159 6 100 Not available Not available
HPE 5856 3 160 3 100 Not available Not available
Mathematics 1 148 1 100 Not available Not available
Music 1 160 1 100 Not available Not available
VCLA 27 520 27 100 Not available Not available
VRA 1 236 1 100 Not available Not available
RVE 12 166 12 100 Not available Not available
2011-2012
Biology 1 166 1 100 100 170
Elementary 5014 15 158 15 100 100 172
English 2 184 2 100 100 185
HPE 4 160 4 100 100 165
VCLA 22 523 22 100 100 544
VRA 6 258 6 100 100 259
RVE 9 164 9 100 100 176
2010-2011
Elementary 0014 6 161 6 100 100 171
Elementary 5014 2 161 2 100 100 172
English 1 186 1 100 99 185
HPE 4 164 4 100 99 166
Music 1 161 1 100 100 171
VCLA 19 531 19 100 100 545
VRA 10 250 10 100 100 259

 

 Measure 7:

Measure 8: Students loan default rates and other consumer information

Section 435(a) (2) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (the HEA) provides that institutions lose eligibility to participate in the Federal Direct Loan and Federal Pell Grant programs when the institution’s federal student loan Cohort Default Rate exceeds 30 percent for each of the three most recently completed federal fiscal years beginning with federal fiscal year 2015. Under Section 435(a)(7) of the HEA, an institution that has a Cohort Default Rate of 30 percent or greater for any one federal fiscal year is required to establish a Default Prevention Task Force to reduce defaults and prevent the loss of institutional eligibility.

As of September 2018, all 93 eligible HBCUs [including Hampton University] have official FY 2015 3-year cohort default rates that fall below regulatory thresholds. No HBCUs are subject to cohort default rate sanctions or the consequent loss of Title IV student financial assistance program eligibility.

HBCUs have deployed innovative approaches towards default management and reduction. Such strategies include implementation of a default management plan that engages stakeholders, identifies approaches to reducing default rates, and tracks measurable goals. These schools have increased borrower awareness of obligations through incorporating borrower topics at orientation sessions and providing enhanced entrance and exit counseling. Other best practices include borrower tracking, increased contact with delinquent borrowers, taking advantage of the cohort default rate challenge/adjustment/appeal processes, and partnering with other stakeholders to optimize default prevention, resolution, and reduction.

Source: https://www2.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/defaultmanagement/dmd002.html